Posts Tagged ‘ patients ’

Nursing Burnout and the Three-Day, Ten-Hour Work Shift

Nursing Burnout and the Three-Day, Ten-Hour Work Shift

It’s no secret that hospital nurses are overworked and underpaid. Worse, long shifts lead to emotional and physical burnout that places the safety of patients, as well as the nurse’s own career, at serious risk. One study revealed that nurses who work shifts longer than ten hours are at sharply increased risk for burnout....

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Obesity: Stop Blaming the Victim, Please!

Obesity: Stop Blaming the Victim, Please!

          The obesity issue is rife with misinformation and oversimplification. Being overweight is not just about gluttony. Indeed, many overweight people eat far less than their thinner counterparts. First, note that discriminating against fat people seems to be the last remaining bastion of bigotry that is socially acceptable. Regardless of...

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Caveat emptor*

Caveat emptor*

There is a Catch-22 (well, one of several) for health care consumers trying to manage medical expenses. This is especially galling if you happen to be in a so-called “consumer-directed health plan,” also known as a high-deductible plan. What’s the catch? The idea of the consumer-directed plan is to make you aware of how...

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Are You a “Dual Eligible”? If so, your prescription drug benefits are enhanced.

Are You a “Dual Eligible”? If so, your prescription drug benefits are enhanced.

If you live in, say,  New York and are on Medicaid, then you become Medicare eligible, do you use Medicaid’s prescription plan, Medicare’s prescription plan, or both? Short answer: Both. But – once eligible for Medicare, Part D is the primary payor for dual eligibles for prescription medication and Medicaid is always the insurer...

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Innovations in Health Care, or, You Can’t Keep a Good Guy Down.

Innovations in Health Care, or, You Can’t Keep a Good Guy Down.

Innovation eschewed in the field of medicine? From the KevinMD blog, an interesting article from several perspectives: how medical practice is steeped in convention, how Dr. Parkinson’s experience has implications for the field of patient advocacy, and whether patients with low-literacy issues would have been able to keep up with the technology-reliant administration of...

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A hospital patient has fewer odds of surviving than an airline passenger.

A hospital patient has fewer odds of surviving than an airline passenger.

  Seems counterintuitive, yes? But examine the facts.  High infection rates (1 out of 3 on a “good” day) can be virtually eliminated; medical errors significantly so. Both require commitment from the public, hospital administrators, and the government. So please don’t be afraid to ask clinicians if they’ve washed their hands before touching a patient! This includes...

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Is Your Pain “Real”?

Is Your Pain “Real”?

Doctors are being taken to task for prescribing pain killers — specifically the opioids, such as hydrocodone and oxycontin. It is estimated that one out of five patients falsify their symptoms and are substance-abusers. But note that the 20% abuse rate can be resolved 90% of the time: does the patient cooperate with additional...

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